Navy
   
 
Turkey in the First World War
 
 


Nusrat








Nusrat, oil painting by Haslet Soyöz, 2003

Tonnage: 360 tonnes
Length: 40.2 m.
Beam: 7.5 m.
Draught: 3.4 m.
Engines: 2 triple 3 cyl vertical, 1200 hp, Germania
Speed: 12 kts.
Armament: 2-47 mm quick fire guns (Krupp)
40 mines

Record:
* Launched on December 4, 1911.
* Commissioned by the Turkish Navy in 1913.
* on January 15, 1915, Nusrat sighted the French Submarine Saphir, which attempted to break through the Dardanelles to the Sea of Marmara. Together with two other Turkish vessels, Nusrat opened fire. Saphir sunk, with Nusrat rescuing 13 of her 27 crew members.
* On the night of March 7/8, 1915, Nusrat laid a 26-mine barrage at the Dardanelles, parallel to the shore. These mines played a vital role in the defeat of the Allied fleet that forced the Straits on March 18, 1915.
* Between 1918 and 1926, she was laid up at Istanbul and operated as a mine search ship at the Sea of Marmara.
* Refitted by the Turkish Navy in 1926-1927 at the shipyards in Gölcük.
* In 1937, Nusrat was renamed as Yardım and used as a diver support ship. In 1939, she got her name Nusrat back.
* Decommissioned in 1955.
* Sold to a private company in 1962. Nusrat was used as a cargo ship from 1962 to 1966 under the name of Captain Nusrat.
* By 1989, Nusrat was in terrible condition. In the port of Mersin, she was rescued by cranes while she was turning aside.
* In 1990, Nusrat sank in the port of Mersin. At the same year, she was floated and anchored in the harbour. Owners donated their shares to Mersin City Hospital and Turkish Red Crescent. The hospital and Turkish Red Crescent could not do anything with this half-sunk ship.
* In 2003, Nusrat was brought to Tarsus, at the eastern Mediterranean coast of Turkey, renovated and opened to public as a museum ship.
* In 2010, the Turkish Navy launched a fully functional replica of Nusrat in Çanakkale, as a traveling museum ship.


Commander of Nusrat,
Captain İsmail Hakkı Bey

Mining officer of Nusrat,
Nazmi Bey

 

 
 
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